Jin Shrines, Unified Rejoicing Gazebo  晉祠同樂亭

https://architecturasinica.org/place/000048o

Names

  • Unified Rejoicing Gazebo/Complex (English)
  • 同樂亭 (Traditional Chinese)
  • 同乐亭 (Simplified Chinese)
  • Tónglètíng (Pinyin)
  • T`ung-le-t`ing (Wade-Giles)
  • Fu Shan Memorial (English)
  • 傅山紀念館 (Traditional Chinese)
  • 傅山纪念馆 (Simplified Chinese)

Building Information

"Originally a small sanctuary (jingshe 精舍), later it became a residence for Daoists and was called a Daoist Cloister. Modified in the 2nd year of the Qianlong period (1737) to include a five-bay hall on the south side, two three-bay halls on the east and west, and pingmen 屏門 gate at the front. Also called Yijianju 一鑒居. The name Tongle is a reference is to Mengzi’s discussion about rulers sharing his pleasures with the people in order to gain their favor. High ministers would stay here when they were visiting, and “rejoice together” with the people of the Jinci area. And because ministers stayed here it was also called a Shangguan Ting 上官亭. It was expanded to current configuration in 1963 and made into a memorial hall to the scholar and calligrapher Fu Shan. Expanded to current configuration in 1963."1

Date 1737-1963
Dynasty Qing 1644-1912 2

Works Cited

Any information without attribution has been created following the Syriaca.org editorial guidelines.

  • 1 MILLER, Divine Nature of Power, 192.Link to Zotero Bibliographic Record
  • 2 WILKINSON, Chinese History: A Manual, 12.Link to Zotero Bibliographic Record

Contained in Place


How to Cite This Entry

Tracy Miller, “Jin Shrines, Unified Rejoicing Gazebo 晉祠同樂亭 ” in Architectura Sinica last modified October 23, 2020, https://architecturasinica.org/place/000048o.

Bibliography:

Tracy Miller, “Jin Shrines, Unified Rejoicing Gazebo 晉祠同樂亭 .” In Architectura Sinica, edited by . Entry published October 23, 2020. https://architecturasinica.org/place/000048o.

About this Entry

Entry Title: Jin Shrines, Unified Rejoicing Gazebo 晉祠同樂亭

Authorial and Editorial Responsibility:

  • Tracy Miller, entry contributor, “Jin Shrines, Unified Rejoicing Gazebo 晉祠同樂亭

Additional Credit:

  • Editing and proof correction Tracy Miller
  • Data entry Liyan Shen

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